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Five More Useful Greasemonkey Scripts for YouTube

It was two blog posts ago that I released and wrote about a Greasemonkey script that adds links below embedded YouTube videos that, when clicked, take the user to the YouTube page on which the embedded video can be found. And it was during this time period that I describe as “two blog posts ago” that I have tried to find more and better ways of getting people to consider this script useful. In fact, I have been asked if this script was actually useful at all. I have mentioned a few ways in which it could be considered useful in that blog post that I use here as a reference point for measuring the passage of time. I mentioned that after seeing one of these embedded videos, some might want to view what is on the YouTube page for the video. Examples of what one might want to see on this page are comments on the video, the code for embedding the video, and links to related and similar videos. Another reason for viewing these YouTube pages that I mentioned is that there are Greasemonkey scripts that work with these YouTube pages that make it so one would want to view the page for the video, rather than the embedded video. And in this post, I discuss a few of these scripts.

Before I do begin discussion of these scripts, I should note that a discussion of Greasemonkey scripts for YouTube is already available elsewhere. It is on that social networking news blog named Mashable where there is a blog post titled “12 Essential Greasemonkey Hacks for YouTube.” I should mention that before finding out about this post, I did consider writing a blog entry in which I discuss useful Greasemonkey scripts for YouTube. And so it is quite fortunate that I found out about this post before publishing this entry, as I certainly would prefer that this post not be considered redundant by the many people who have already read that post on Mashable. I am writing this entry to complement that post that I mention, as listing twelve of these scripts is, in my opinion, not quite enough. There are other scripts like these that deserve to be mentioned, and so it is here that I mention another five of these scripts that YouTube users may be interested in using. And so without any further ado, here are another five Greasemonkey scripts for YouTube that are worth a look.

  1. YouTube Resizer. It was shortly after reading this blog post on Lifehacker about stretching YouTube videos to fit the width of the browser that I found out about this script. Adam Pash wrote about wanting to make YouTube videos larger, without having to having to use the “hugely pixelated fullscreen interface.” He mentioned that a bookmarklet or Greasemonkey script that redirects the user to a page in which the video display is larger would be good to have. Then I checked to see if a Greasemonkey script for doing this already exists, and I found this one, which is similar to what is described in that post, except that this one is better. It makes the area for displaying the video larger, without redirecting the user to another page.
  2. YouTube Prevent Autoplay. Have you ever wanted go to the page for a YouTube video without having the video immediately play? Perhaps you simply would like to read through comments on these videos, even if it sometimes seems that the majority of these comments are spam. Or you may only want to look for videos that are considered similar to the one you are bringing up. And this script is also one that is quite useful when testing out Greasemonkey scripts that work with YouTube pages, as I have found out. There may be a number of reasons for wanting the video on the page to be played only when you tell it to do so, and I personally have kept this script enabled at all times.
  3. YouTube BetterTitles. The individual who wrote this script puts it best by describing it as follows: “Many pages on YouTube have the same title: ‘YouTube – Broadcast Yourself.’ If you have several tabs open, things get confusing. This simple script changes the title on some often-used YouTube pages. Examples for improved titles include ‘Manage contacts’ or ‘Most Recent (page 3).’” So if you find that you would like to have several videos open in separate tabs, as I sometimes do, then this script is essential.
  4. YouTube Better Embed. I have mentioned in a previous blog post that the code for embedding videos that is included on the YouTube pages on which YouTube videos can be viewed is not compliant with XHTML 1.0. And so if you would like to copy and paste the code for embedding a YouTube video into the code for a web page, and would like to do so without using any tags that are considered deprecated, then you’ll find this script useful.
  5. YouTube Comments Next to Videos. There may be times that you would like to peruse comments comments on a YouTube video while watching the video. And this script, which was inspired by the design of Google Video pages, enables you to do so by putting these comments next to the video. There is the script named “YouTube Googler” that makes the design of YouTube video pages similar to the design of pages on Google Video. However, if it is only this one feature that you would like to borrow from Google Video, then this is the script that you would want.

In this post, I have mentioned scripts such as these as reasons to want to visit the YouTube page on which a YouTube video is located, after finding a YouTube video embedded in a web page. Some have already found these scripts that I mention useful, judging by the number of times they have been downloaded. And for this reason, perhaps a few more people will consider the script that I wrote for embedded YouTube videos useful. I may have more to learn about marketing of the software that I write, and informing people of what I write and why it can be useful is something that I would like to do well. And marketing of what I write is something I have considered writing an entire blog post about, and that may be a post that will appear a few blog posts from now. And hopefully “a few blog posts from now” will not be considered a very long time when measured in days or weeks.

10 Comments

  1. David Grant wrote:

    The Resizer doesn’t work now after adding the others. Disabling the others doesn’t bring it back. Also the Prevent Autoplay prevents me from being able to jump to another point in the clip.

    Wednesday, October 24, 2007 at 11:12 pm | Permalink
  2. David Grant wrote:

    Ok, load Resizer last and that seems to fix some issues.

    Wednesday, October 24, 2007 at 11:14 pm | Permalink
  3. Vince wrote:

    Here is a utility for YouTube which can save people lots of time in my opinion.

    which allows you to BATCH download videos and convert to format for ipod, zune etc…
    with just 1-Click (well…depends on how you count it :>)

    anyway…they have a youtube video explain how it works:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D7wtuT0Ey8k

    check it out and see if you like it.

    Cheers

    Thursday, October 25, 2007 at 10:58 pm | Permalink
  4. jkasprzak wrote:

    Hello David and Vince, and thank you for your comments. I do appreciate receiving your feedback and your expansion upon what I have written here.

    Perhaps I should have mentioned that these scripts, while useful on their own, may not necessarily work well together. I actually considered mentioning that in this entry, but I ultimately decided that it was not necessary for me to say that not all Greasemonkey scripts may be considered compatible with others. For instance, a script that removes comments would obviously not work well with a script that puts comments in a different place. Still, I could have done more to make it clear that having all of these scripts enabled at the same time may not be a good idea, and I would like to thank David for mentioning this.

    I would also like to greet those who are coming over from Lifehacker.com to view this post, even though it might be considered too late for me to do so. However you got here though, I would like to note that I plan on posting a blog entry here as a followup to this one, in which I expand on what I have said in this post.

    Thanks again,

    J.K.

    Friday, October 26, 2007 at 3:24 am | Permalink
  5. TR wrote:

    A bit of constructive criticism:

    While the YouTube hacks are very interesting, the post itself suffers from a bit of logorrhea. By the time I got to the actual scripts, I had waded through so much extraneous and often irrelevant info that my eyes had gone fuzzy. All the “thinking out loud” stuff concerning what you considered writing about and what you may later write about is tedious to read and stands in the way of the subject at hand. Sure, it’s your blog, but if you’re concerned with creating something useful, hit the key points and trim some of the fat. You’re readers will appreciate it.

    Friday, October 26, 2007 at 4:56 pm | Permalink
  6. David Grant wrote:

    TR needs to learn how to skim read.

    Saturday, October 27, 2007 at 12:35 am | Permalink
  7. Nic wrote:

    I found the embed script invaluable. I haven’t been able to post embedded videos in my blog as the whole site visually goes wonky. I haven’t the energy to figure out why so for the whole two videos I wanted to share I just linked them. Well, I tried the embed one and by golly the embeds work now. Fab!

    Monday, November 5, 2007 at 2:22 am | Permalink
  8. jkasprzak wrote:

    Well, I did not expect to see any comments saying that the “YouTube Better Embed” script was invaluable. However, it is good to know that it helped you solve that problem that you had with embedding videos.

    I would like to once again greet those who clicked on the link to get here from Lifehacker. I see that what was written there about this blog entry was included among a list of “how to’s” there recently.

    And to all those visiting, I would like to say that I plan on posting another blog entry that further expands on what I have written here. I plan on writing more about what Adam Pash suggested about the possibility of a “Better YouTube” extension as I look further into how such an extension can be made. I expect to have this entry posted sometime in the next few days.

    Also, to follow up further on what was written here, I should note at this time that the “YouTube Comments Next to Videos” seems to need to be updated.

    Thanks,

    J.K.

    Monday, November 5, 2007 at 5:52 am | Permalink
  9. John Fowler wrote:

    how do I ‘install’ your scripts?
    Can you give me some kind of simple instructions? Thanks!
    I’m a Mac-savvy person, but have never ‘done’ apple scripting before.

    Wednesday, December 5, 2007 at 8:08 pm | Permalink
  10. jkasprzak wrote:

    Hello John.

    I personally suggest that you first ensure that you are using the Mozilla Firefox web browser, which you can download after you click here. Then, you will need to download and install the Greasemonkey extension for Firefox, which can you download after you click here. Then you can visit Userscripts.org and look there for scripts that you would like to install. I understand that these scripts can possibly be used with other browsers, although I also understand that they work most reliably with the Greasemonkey extension for Firefox.

    If you have any questions about these instructions, please do not hesitate to ask me any questions that you have about them. There are many useful Greasemonkey scripts available that you may like using. And for those who found this post interesting, and would like to know of more scripts that I’d recommend, you may click here for a list of scripts I recommend to users of Gmail.

    Thursday, December 6, 2007 at 2:03 am | Permalink

13 Trackbacks/Pingbacks

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